Peer-to-peer reconition

Peer Recognition Success at DeSmart

By George Dickson on March 04, 2015

I’m always motivated by success stories.

It’s infinitely encouraging to see leaders who care about their team, digging into the fundamentals of what motivates and engages them, and working hard to provide a supportive environment. When I read Piotr Duszyński’s blog post “How to Reward Employees? Let Them Do It Themselves” I was excited to see the team at DeSmart benefiting so much from their implementation of peer recognition.

In his article, Piotr describes his fruitless early searches for an effective employee recognition, reward, and engagement strategy to deploy.

Contingent motivation (if/then reward) strategies can work under a limited scope, but often encourage undesired results, particularly in work where creativity is crucial. Handing out bonuses personally was difficult to keep up with, and always carried the risk of missing out on a great contribution and the opportunity to reward it. After examining myriad systems, Piotr identified peer recognition as a system in stark contrast to the others.

Peer recognition gives an entire team the power to recognize and reward each member’s contributions. Crowdsourcing recognition relieves management from the burden of playing arbiter and singlehandedly witnessing, recognizing, and rewarding all the great work that happens daily. It also improves the company’s ability to reliably recognize and reward diverse contributions, because colleagues who work closely on a daily basis are more apt to recognize, appreciate, and understand the gravity of their neighbor’s daily wins.

Piotr explains his individual approach to managing DeSmart’s Bonusly account:

"There are no rules...it’s that simple — you don’t have to regulate it."

Although his Laissez-faire approach may seem foreign to some managers, Piotr explains his reasoning, while discussing an interesting point about the relativity of value people place on certain activities.

"...there are a couple of things that could be qualified as “stupid” but actually they are not...they were given from people to people...People learn about things that other people need and they help each other."

Great work and problem solving can come in unexpected shapes and sizes; the most important part is how these activities help your team reach its goals. I’m proud to see the DeSmart team’s successful implementation, and can’t wait to hear more as their story continues.

Interested in experiencing the benefits of peer recognition at your company?

Grab a seat, and join me at our next demo!

Written by George Dickson

George Dickson

George manages content and community at Bonusly. He's dedicated to strengthening organizational cultures through thoughtful leadership and frequent recognition.